Strap Interview

Interview: We’re right here with Strap. The first thing I want to ask you is where does the Strap name come from?

Strap: I thought a lot of different names – - with different meanings and that is the one and jumped right out stuck with me. I made an acronym out of it. It stands for Strength Through Rhythm And Poetry.

Interview: How did that idea come to you?

Strap: Just from bouncing ideas around with my people. However, when somebody would hear the name Strap – - they would affiliate it with a gun and me being strapped or whatever. They always think I got guns because of the name. To be completely clear, it’s not even about that and I tell them what it stands for.

Interview: I’m not surprised they revert the name back to you being strapped with a gun. So you try and revert away from that meaning?

Strap: I try to stray away from that, because it’s not what the name represents. Honestly, I don’t want to branded, affiliated or have anything to do with that title as far as linking it too guns or anything to anything violent. Like I said, Strap is an acronym for Strength Through Rhythm And Poetry.

Interview: Good stuff. Growing up in the Bronx, what was that like for you?

Strap: It was rough – - and I had it a little rougher, because I grew up with a disability my whole life. I was born with Tourettes Syndrome. That made going through elementary, junior high and high school really difficult, because people don’t really understand it. In this day and age, kids are mean – nobody asks questions – - they just point and laugh. I went through a lot of days full of depression because of my disability and it was extremely hard on me growing up. We didn’t have a lot of money, living paycheck-to-paycheck – - just trying to be a glue and holding things together. It was very rough for me growing up, but I found my strength through rhythm and poetry.

Interview: More specifically, how did the Tourettes Syndrome directly affect your upbringing?

Strap: It kept people away from me and I was isolated… I didn’t have many friends, because people would make fun of me more than trying to embrace me and look past it. It made it difficult job wise, because dealing with customers all the time – - they’re not looking to come across a representative at any company that is faced with a disability of that caliber. They don’t want to come up on somebody who is making slight noises or twitching a little bit. It’s a little overwhelming to [people] at sometimes. It was really stressful trying to grow up, to where I had to really hold it in just because I wanted to appear quote/unquote – normal to people. It made things very hard for me, but I had dreams of pursuing a career in music, but even I was discouraged wondering if the Tourettes would directly, or indirectly affect that too.

Interview: Which steps did you take or lay out for yourself to overcome such a struggle?

Strap: My mother was so strong and she would say this is how you were born and you have to accept it, because there is nothing you can do about it. However, me growing up in a rough neighborhood – - I always wanted to be one of the cool kids too, so that was an inner-conflict that forced me to try and hold it in at certain points. I could suppress it at certain points, like I wouldn’t do anything like a regular “normal” human being – but then again, what is normal nowadays? I would suppress the Tourettes as long as I could and just go about my days. It’s hard to explain, because it’s really a difficult thing. There are a lot of aspects to it called tics, you have vocal tic, which can be making repetitive sounds or yelling out cuss words – - and then there are motor tics that can be rapid blinking or twitching and things of that nature.

At times, when I just couldn’t hold it in, it would draw unwanted attention to me. I would be forced to remove myself from the situation. For example, if someone noticed me on the train having an episode, I would get off – - even if it was not my stop, because I was that embarrassed  and ashamed of what I was doing. To make a long story short, I came to accept this is as what I am and over the years,…. people began looking past it as I got older. It’s apart of me and it makes me my unique self. When I do music, not only am I talented – - but it sets me from all of the rest. I am Strap the strength through rhythm and poetry.

Interview: Do you still struggle with it today? How do you find your struggles with it changed, as you got older?

Strap: I think it has been a little more intense, but I just deal with it. For some, they say it can fade as you get older, but unfortunately, mine is still with me (laughs)… It’s a big part of my motivation… I want to make it in this music industry, especially for people who share my same disability – - or with any disability for that matter, and show them if you work hard and you have the talent, drive and dedication – - people will give you a shot and look past it and accept you for your determination and abilities. I don’t let it get in the way of my music. If you listen to my music, clearly nobody can tell I have it. Even when I’m performing, you can’t tell because I can suppress it when its crunch time – - but its very much there. You see, when my mind is focused on certain things, it strays away from it and I can be focused on the music or performing, it has to be something of that extent. If I’m in my house in my own comfort zone with people I know… I’m free to be myself. They don’t look at me in any kind of way. As far as up to date, it just makes it a little more difficult to record, because I might tic in between recordings go off and I have to do a couple of takes. I might have a little motion and it messes up the recording. It brings a little bit of difficulty, but I manage to get it done clearly, as you can hear in my music…

Interview: You grew up in Bronx, New York – the birth of hip-hop. Growing up, who were your influences?

Strap: I would have to say Rakim and KRS-One definitely being that he is from the Bronx. I was also influenced by Big Pun and Biggie. If we’re talking music in general, I grew up on Ron Isley, Bootsy Collins, R Kelly, Marvin Gaye… all good music from, many different genres has inspired me throughout the years.

Interview: Let’s focus on your personal style of music. Is it a boom bap east coast type of style?

Strap: I would say my style is my very own Strap style. I don’t want to classify it as anything else, but Strap style. I rap – - but I also mix singing into it because I love to sing. If I had a chance and I had a voice like somebody like Ne-Yo or Usher, I would do that. Since I can’t, I mesh it together. My style of music is R&B and Rap – - with a hint of pop in it. I’m very melodic with my music and I’m not afraid to experiment and take it a different level. I will always step outside the box for the people…

Interview: Let’s talk about the “R.O.A. Rebirth of Auto Tune” mixtape. Tell us about that.

Strap: One word to describe that, dope. The whole idea and inspiration behind that was from the Jay-Z record, “Death of Auto Tune.” Basically, his song was to banish everybody from using auto tune. How many people are really going to go against what Jay-Z says and actually do what they want? Not many, which is so sad to me… I think I’m the first to actually do something with a concept like this and put it out. Of course I respect Jay-Z and what he has done for the business of hip-hop culture, but I don’t think Jay-Z has the almighty and final say in what doesn’t go in hip-hop. He might be Hova, but he’s definitely not the Jehovah – - and no offense, but I do think he suffers from a real God complex… but really, I have no idea, as I don’t know him.

I felt like Jay-Z – - a man of his caliber and making the money he is, he shouldn’t really be concerned about that, because regardless he has his own fan-base and he’s going to sell records no matter what. Why destroy Auto Tune for anybody trying to come up and use it? I’m not anybody to go against Jay-Z, but I still wanted to put out the music that I made where I incorporated Auto Tune in it. I labeled my mixtape “Rebirth of Auto Tune” and I feel that every track is dope on the mixtape and I used Auto Tune the way it’s supposed to be used on every track.

I know Jay-Z was just trying to direct it towards people who were using it wrong… and let’s be honest, there were a lot of people using it wrong – - for example Ron Browz. He makes beats and he should stick to that. Everyone now thinks, “oh its autotune, I dont have to be able to sing” and that is wrong. I feel that’s the perfect example of how not to use Auto Tune. Lil Wayne is another one… He is a great artist and very lyrical, but if you are going to use the Auto Tune – - do it right, otherwise you are just making it irritating to listen too. I personally use Auto Tune how it was intended to be used and I display that very nicely on the R.O.A Mixtape.

Interview: Are you personally a fan of Auto Tune?

Strap: I wouldn’t say a fan but yeah, obviously – - I like using it and right now if Jay-Z killed it, then I’m here bringing it back to life…Honestly, this mixtape is the most I’ve ever used it, which only because I gave it the name that I did and I wanted to stay within the theme and concept… I – - like so many people all over the world, like the sound of Auto Tune, but as I said, only when it is used one right…To me, Auto Tune is not that bad at all. People basically say, because of Jay-Z – - that if you use Auto Tune, then it’s wack. The reason is because people tend to follow a trend instead of using their own mind. Going back to Jay-Z – - he said what he said about Auto Tune and he brainwashes people, and everybody starts yelling “No more Auto Tune!”

I watched a couple of interviews, with one of my all-time favorite producers, Swizz Beats, and I quote him: “if it’s hot, it’s hot,” If you use auto tune and it’s a hit record, then it’s a hit record. If you use it and it’s not, then it’s not. If something is hot, it’s undeniable and not everybody is complaining about Auto Tune. I’ve gone and done shows in Miami where the crowd was mainly Caucasian and they weren’t complaining, because at the end of the day, good music is good music. I’m not saying it has anything to do with minorities, but when something is hot, it’s hot, period. I was in the process of using Auto Tune before his record came out and I don’t feel that Jay-Z doing his “DOA” record should stop my project.

Most people would go with the grain, but I chose to against the grain. People will either accept it or they don’t. Now people might say, Strap is wack or whatever, but those will probably just be the die hard Jay-Z fans that he constantly brainwashes… but real recognizes real and people will see where I’m coming from and show love because, humbly speaking – - the mixtape is very creative and I put a lot of work into it. It’s not all singing either, I gave it a nice balance. And for the record, it’s now the rebirth of Auto Tune.

Interview: Through the whole brainwashing element, do you think Jay-Z really contributed to the so-called death of Auto Tune? I say “so-called” because whether it died or not is pretty debatable.

Strap: I do. There are a lot of people who feel like I feel. As soon as he did that, everybody jumped on the bandwagon. [Funkmaster] Flex, one of the most powerful and influential radio DJ’s in the world said “this should have been happened.” Jay-Z is not the almighty say in what goes. I think the people say what’s hot and what’s not – - not one man to dictate for us all. He’s not the second coming… If anyone says Auto Tune is dead, tell them Strap said it’s still alive and kicking. Let’s keep it real, Flex supported what Jay-Z said, because Jay-Z gave him props in the song. Jay-Z is very strategic. He even has Flex brainwashed (laughs).

Interview: It’s ironic that the same DJ’s who jumped on it were the same ones playing the hit records with Auto Tune in the first place.

Strap: My point exactly! They still play them now because I can name records now that are up to date, that people feel and think are good records. Drake uses Auto Tune. I went to school for engineering and I mix my own music. Drake uses it and people don’t really hate on Drake for using Auto Tune. You know why? It’s hot music and Drake is a very talented artist. People don’t really hate on Lil Wayne for Auto Tune either. Of course, people are going to say things about Lil Wayne – - but at the end of the day, the love people have for Lil Wayne outweighs the hate. Another thing is… Jay-Z is a Drake fan, so to me that’s a contradiction. Even singers like Jason Derulo – - he’s using it and he can really sing.

I personally think Jay-Z has too much money to be worried about something that is not affecting him; it’s not affecting his sales or his brand. If Jay-Z said rebirth of Auto Tune tomorrow, everybody would be saying the same thing and following his lead…That’s the bottom line.

Interview: How do you think Jay-Z would react to your “Rebirth of Auto Tune” title?

Strap: I think he just did the record to do it because knows people will follow whatever he says. As far as that, if Jay-Z ever heard what I did on the record, he wouldn’t have a problem with it. In the “DOA” song, he said “get back to rapping your T-Pain’ing too much” – - a lot of artists were just using it to attempt and singing. I don’t want to be labeled as a rapper. I’m an artist because I do R&B as well. When you listen to my “ROA” mixtape – - there are a few R&B songs too, because I can write R&B music and rap. I don’t think if Jay-Z heard my music he wouldn’t have a problem with it because of my lyrical display. Yes, I incorporated Auto Tune, but I kept it flavorful so you want to listen to the next track. You want to see where I’m going with it… I put it out it and a lot of people think it’s hot.

Interview: So it’s already out for free?

Strap: I have it up on www.datpiff.com and a few tracks on YouTube and MySpace at www.myspace.com/therealstrap. You can download the whole mixtape at:  http://www.datpiff.com/NONE_STRAP_Roarebirth_Of_Autotune.m86309.html

Interview: Are there any singles you’re trying to push off the project?

Strap: Definitely. There are three singles up there. I’m currently working on an EP as well. I put them up on my page to give people a taste. One single is “Promise to Call” produced by my girl Conyak. It’s a pretty up-tempo joint, a club banger and a very hot record. The song is radio friendly and I got unsigned hyped off of the song on Dream Big, Hustle Hard. The ladies love it and it’s for them. I’m both singing and rapping on that song…The next single is “Baby Girl” and it’s produced by Cavstar – - which is another dope record. That’s a full R&B song with no rapping whatsoever. It’s a moderate tempo and another song for the ladies that I think they will definitely love. The third single and the last track on the mixtape is called “Back in the Club” and it’s produced by Halo. That song is just straight up sick!!!!

Interview: When is the EP coming?

Strap: God willing, I’m pushing for a March release. I’m still trying to get the right production, because I’m very picky when it comes to music. I want to have the right selection of music and I don’t want to just throw anything out. I want it to be quality and I want it to be classic – - something they can always throw on and say this album is timeless.

Interview: Is that what’s next up for Strap? Let everybody know what’s going on.

Strap: I’m working on The EP… I’m also working on my protégée Young Scoob’s mixtape, which I will be featured on. There’s no title yet for the new mixtape but its in the works.

Interview: Thanks a lot for your time Strap. We’ve had a very good time with you and want to make sure everybody checks out the “Rebirth of Auto Tune” mixtape on www.datpiff.com. Make sure you listen to this explanation of that, it’s a really cool title. Will link up again, do you have any last words before I let you go?

Strap: Make sure you go and download that “ROA” mixtape… Don’t be afraid, or pass a preliminary judgment because of the title. It’s for both the Auto Tuners and the Anti-Auto Tuners. Get it and spread the word. I’m here and I think it’s my turn to get a fair shot at this whole music thing with my strength through rhythm and poetry… Hit me up on MySpace – www.myspace.com/therealstrap

Interview: We’re right here with Strap. The first thing I want to ask you is where does the Strap name come from?
Strap: I thought a lot of different names – - with different meanings and that is the one and jumped right out stuck with me. I made an acronym out of it. It stands for Strength Through Rhythm And Poetry.
Interview: How did that idea come to you?
Strap: Just from bouncing ideas around with my people. However, when somebody would hear the name Strap – - they would affiliate it with a gun and me being strapped or whatever. They always think I got guns because of the name. To be completely clear, it’s not even about that and I tell them what it stands for.
Interview: I’m not surprised they revert the name back to you being strapped with a gun. So you try and revert away from that meaning?
Strap: I try to stray away from that, because it’s not what the name represents. Honestly, I don’t want to branded, affiliated or have anything to do with that title as far as linking it too guns or anything to anything violent. Like I said, Strap is an acronym for Strength Through Rhythm And Poetry.
Interview: Good stuff. Growing up in the Bronx, what was that like for you?
Strap: It was rough – - and I had it a little rougher, because I grew up with a disability my whole life. I was born with Tourettes Syndrome. That made going through elementary, junior high and high school really difficult, because people don’t really understand it. In this day and age, kids are mean – nobody asks questions – - they just point and laugh. I went through a lot of days full of depression because of my disability and it was extremely hard on me growing up. We didn’t have a lot of money, living paycheck-to-paycheck – - just trying to be a glue and holding things together. It was very rough for me growing up, but I found my strength through rhythm and poetry.
Interview: More specifically, how did the Tourettes Syndrome directly affect your upbringing?
Strap: It kept people away from me and I was isolated… I didn’t have many friends, because people would make fun of me more than trying to embrace me and look past it. It made it difficult job wise, because dealing with customers all the time – - they’re not looking to come across a representative at any company that is faced with a disability of that caliber. They don’t want to come up on somebody who is making slight noises or twitching a little bit. It’s a little overwhelming to [people] at sometimes. It was really stressful trying to grow up, to where I had to really hold it in just because I wanted to appear quote/unquote – normal to people. It made things very hard for me, but I had dreams of pursuing a career in music, but even I was discouraged wondering if the Tourettes would directly, or indirectly affect that too.
Interview: Which steps did you take or lay out for yourself to overcome such a struggle?
Strap: My mother was so strong and she would say this is how you were born and you have to accept it, because there is nothing you can do about it. However, me growing up in a rough neighborhood – - I always wanted to be one of the cool kids too, so that was an inner-conflict that forced me to try and hold it in at certain points. I could suppress it at certain points, like I wouldn’t do anything like a regular “normal” human being – but then again, what is normal nowadays? I would suppress the Tourettes as long as I could and just go about my days. It’s hard to explain, because it’s really a difficult thing. There are a lot of aspects to it called tics, you have vocal tic, which can be making repetitive sounds or yelling out cuss words – - and then there are motor tics that can be rapid blinking or twitching and things of that nature.
At times, when I just couldn’t hold it in, it would draw unwanted attention to me. I would be forced to remove myself from the situation. For example, if someone noticed me on the train having an episode, I would get off – - even if it was not my stop, because I was that embarrassed  and ashamed of what I was doing. To make a long story short, I came to accept this is as what I am and over the years,…. people began looking past it as I got older. It’s apart of me and it makes me my unique self. When I do music, not only am I talented – - but it sets me from all of the rest. I am Strap the strength through rhythm and poetry.
Interview: Do you still struggle with it today? How do you find your struggles with it changed, as you got older?
Strap: I think it has been a little more intense, but I just deal with it. For some, they say it can fade as you get older, but unfortunately, mine is still with me (laughs)… It’s a big part of my motivation… I want to make it in this music industry, especially for people who share my same disability – - or with any disability for that matter, and show them if you work hard and you have the talent, drive and dedication – - people will give you a shot and look past it and accept you for your determination and abilities. I don’t let it get in the way of my music. If you listen to my music, clearly nobody can tell I have it. Even when I’m performing, you can’t tell because I can suppress it when its crunch time – - but its very much there. You see, when my mind is focused on certain things, it strays away from it and I can be focused on the music or performing, it has to be something of that extent. If I’m in my house in my own comfort zone with people I know… I’m free to be myself. They don’t look at me in any kind of way. As far as up to date, it just makes it a little more difficult to record, because I might tic in between recordings go off and I have to do a couple of takes. I might have a little motion and it messes up the recording. It brings a little bit of difficulty, but I manage to get it done clearly, as you can hear in my music…
Interview: You grew up in Bronx, New York – the birth of hip-hop. Growing up, who were your influences?
Strap: I would have to say Rakim and KRS-One definitely being that he is from the Bronx. I was also influenced by Big Pun and Biggie. If we’re talking music in general, I grew up on Ron Isley, Bootsy Collins, R Kelly, Marvin Gaye… all good music from, many different genres has inspired me throughout the years.

Interview: Let’s focus on your personal style of music. Is it a boom bap east coast type of style?
Strap: I would say my style is my very own Strap style. I don’t want to classify it as anything else, but Strap style. I rap – - but I also mix singing into it because I love to sing. If I had a chance and I had a voice like somebody like Ne-Yo or Usher, I would do that. Since I can’t, I mesh it together. My style of music is R&B and Rap – - with a hint of pop in it. I’m very melodic with my music and I’m not afraid to experiment and take it a different level. I will always step outside the box for the people…
Interview: Let’s talk about the “R.O.A. Rebirth of Auto Tune” mixtape. Tell us about that.
Strap: One word to describe that, dope. The whole idea and inspiration behind that was from the Jay-Z record, “Death of Auto Tune.” Basically, his song was to banish everybody from using auto tune. How many people are really going to go against what Jay-Z says and actually do what they want? Not many, which is so sad to me… I think I’m the first to actually do something with a concept like this and put it out. Of course I respect Jay-Z and what he has done for the business of hip-hop culture, but I don’t think Jay-Z has the almighty and final say in what doesn’t go in hip-hop. He might be Hova, but he’s definitely not the Jehovah – - and no offense, but I do think he suffers from a real God complex… but really, I have no idea, as I don’t know him.
I felt like Jay-Z – - a man of his caliber and making the money he is, he shouldn’t really be concerned about that, because regardless he has his own fan-base and he’s going to sell records no matter what. Why destroy Auto Tune for anybody trying to come up and use it? I’m not anybody to go against Jay-Z, but I still wanted to put out the music that I made where I incorporated Auto Tune in it. I labeled my mixtape “Rebirth of Auto Tune” and I feel that every track is dope on the mixtape and I used Auto Tune the way it’s supposed to be used on every track.

I know Jay-Z was just trying to direct it towards people who were using it wrong… and let’s be honest, there were a lot of people using it wrong – - for example Ron Browz. He makes beats and he should stick to that. Everyone now thinks, “oh its autotune, I dont have to be able to sing” and that is wrong. I feel that’s the perfect example of how not to use Auto Tune. Lil Wayne is another one… He is a great artist and very lyrical, but if you are going to use the Auto Tune – - do it right, otherwise you are just making it irritating to listen too. I personally use Auto Tune how it was intended to be used and I display that very nicely on the R.O.A Mixtape.
Interview: Are you personally a fan of Auto Tune?
Strap: I wouldn’t say a fan but yeah, obviously – - I like using it and right now if Jay-Z killed it, then I’m here bringing it back to life…Honestly, this mixtape is the most I’ve ever used it, which only because I gave it the name that I did and I wanted to stay within the theme and concept… I – - like so many people all over the world, like the sound of Auto Tune, but as I said, only when it is used one right…To me, Auto Tune is not that bad at all. People basically say, because of Jay-Z – - that if you use Auto Tune, then it’s wack. The reason is because people tend to follow a trend instead of using their own mind. Going back to Jay-Z – - he said what he said about Auto Tune and he brainwashes people, and everybody starts yelling “No more Auto Tune!”

I watched a couple of interviews, with one of my all-time favorite producers, Swizz Beats, and I quote him: “if it’s hot, it’s hot,” If you use auto tune and it’s a hit record, then it’s a hit record. If you use it and it’s not, then it’s not. If something is hot, it’s undeniable and not everybody is complaining about Auto Tune. I’ve gone and done shows in Miami where the crowd was mainly Caucasian and they weren’t complaining, because at the end of the day, good music is good music. I’m not saying it has anything to do with minorities, but when something is hot, it’s hot, period. I was in the process of using Auto Tune before his record came out and I don’t feel that Jay-Z doing his “DOA” record should stop my project.
Most people would go with the grain, but I chose to against the grain. People will either accept it or they don’t. Now people might say, Strap is wack or whatever, but those will probably just be the die hard Jay-Z fans that he constantly brainwashes… but real recognizes real and people will see where I’m coming from and show love because, humbly speaking – - the mixtape is very creative and I put a lot of work into it. It’s not all singing either, I gave it a nice balance. And for the record, it’s now the rebirth of Auto Tune.
Interview: Through the whole brainwashing element, do you think Jay-Z really contributed to the so-called death of Auto Tune? I say “so-called” because whether it died or not is pretty debatable.
Strap: I do. There are a lot of people who feel like I feel. As soon as he did that, everybody jumped on the bandwagon. [Funkmaster] Flex, one of the most powerful and influential radio DJ’s in the world said “this should have been happened.” Jay-Z is not the almighty say in what goes. I think the people say what’s hot and what’s not – - not one man to dictate for us all. He’s not the second coming… If anyone says Auto Tune is dead, tell them Strap said it’s still alive and kicking. Let’s keep it real, Flex supported what Jay-Z said, because Jay-Z gave him props in the song. Jay-Z is very strategic. He even has Flex brainwashed (laughs).
Interview: It’s ironic that the same DJ’s who jumped on it were the same ones playing the hit records with Auto Tune in the first place.
Strap: My point exactly! They still play them now because I can name records now that are up to date, that people feel and think are good records. Drake uses Auto Tune. I went to school for engineering and I mix my own music. Drake uses it and people don’t really hate on Drake for using Auto Tune. You know why? It’s hot music and Drake is a very talented artist. People don’t really hate on Lil Wayne for Auto Tune either. Of course, people are going to say things about Lil Wayne – - but at the end of the day, the love people have for Lil Wayne outweighs the hate. Another thing is… Jay-Z is a Drake fan, so to me that’s a contradiction. Even singers like Jason Derulo – - he’s using it and he can really sing.
I personally think Jay-Z has too much money to be worried about something that is not affecting him; it’s not affecting his sales or his brand. If Jay-Z said rebirth of Auto Tune tomorrow, everybody would be saying the same thing and following his lead…That’s the bottom line.
Interview: How do you think Jay-Z would react to your “Rebirth of Auto Tune” title?
Strap: I think he just did the record to do it because knows people will follow whatever he says. As far as that, if Jay-Z ever heard what I did on the record, he wouldn’t have a problem with it. In the “DOA” song, he said “get back to rapping your T-Pain’ing too much” – - a lot of artists were just using it to attempt and singing. I don’t want to be labeled as a rapper. I’m an artist because I do R&B as well. When you listen to my “ROA” mixtape – - there are a few R&B songs too, because I can write R&B music and rap. I don’t think if Jay-Z heard my music he wouldn’t have a problem with it because of my lyrical display. Yes, I incorporated Auto Tune, but I kept it flavorful so you want to listen to the next track. You want to see where I’m going with it… I put it out it and a lot of people think it’s hot.
Interview: So it’s already out for free?
Strap: I have it up on www.datpiff.com and a few tracks on YouTube and MySpace at www.myspace.com/therealstrap. You can download the whole mixtape at:  http://www.datpiff.com/NONE_STRAP_Roarebirth_Of_Autotune.m86309.html
Interview: Are there any singles you’re trying to push off the project?
Strap: Definitely. There are three singles up there. I’m currently working on an EP as well. I put them up on my page to give people a taste. One single is “Promise to Call” produced by my girl Conyak. It’s a pretty up-tempo joint, a club banger and a very hot record. The song is radio friendly and I got unsigned hyped off of the song on Dream Big, Hustle Hard. The ladies love it and it’s for them. I’m both singing and rapping on that song…The next single is “Baby Girl” and it’s produced by Cavstar – - which is another dope record. That’s a full R&B song with no rapping whatsoever. It’s a moderate tempo and another song for the ladies that I think they will definitely love. The third single and the last track on the mixtape is called “Back in the Club” and it’s produced by Halo. That song is just straight up sick!!!!
Interview: When is the EP coming?
Strap: God willing, I’m pushing for a March release. I’m still trying to get the right production, because I’m very picky when it comes to music. I want to have the right selection of music and I don’t want to just throw anything out. I want it to be quality and I want it to be classic – - something they can always throw on and say this album is timeless.
Interview: Is that what’s next up for Strap? Let everybody know what’s going on.
Strap: I’m working on The EP… I’m also working on my protégée Young Scoob’s mixtape, which I will be featured on. There’s no title yet for the new mixtape but its in the works.
Interview: Thanks a lot for your time Strap. We’ve had a very good time with you and want to make sure everybody checks out the “Rebirth of Auto Tune” mixtape on www.datpiff.com. Make sure you listen to this explanation of that, it’s a really cool title. Will link up again, do you have any last words before I let you go?
Strap: Make sure you go and download that “ROA” mixtape… Don’t be afraid, or pass a preliminary judgment because of the title. It’s for both the Auto Tuners and the Anti-Auto Tuners. Get it and spread the word. I’m here and I think it’s my turn to get a fair shot at this whole music thing with my strength through rhythm and poetry… Hit me up on MySpace – www.myspace.com/therealstrap

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